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Books of the Futurists

Futurism was invented by Italians, but its creation was announced in France. In 1909 the writer Filippo Tommaso Marinetti and the painter Umberto Boccioni published the "Manifesto of Futurism" in the pages of the Parisian "Le Figaro". What did it say? Briefly: down with the past! The only important thing is what tomorrow will bring. It should be full of dynamism, movement, momentum. It has to rush ahead, no matter how blindly it may sometimes be. At the exhibition "Books of the Futurists" in the reading room, we present a book collection belonging to Jalu Kurek - a writer who translated the poetry of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti.

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Place

ms1, 36 Więckowskiego St, entrance from 43 Gdańska St, reading room

Time

January 18 - April 1, 2022

While the call to build a better world may have appealed, the means of achieving this goal must have agitated the "terrible bourgeoisie," busy with their ordinary lives, yet unacceptable from the futurists' point of view: "We want to destroy museums, libraries, fight moralism, feminism, and all manifestations of opportunistic and utilitarian cowardice," the futurists wrote. According to them, beauty lay in modern civilization, pulsating with the nervous rhythm of machines.

It has been known for a long time that artists can predict the future in an amazing way. Sometimes they make gestures that only initiate changes, sometimes they completely destroy the existing world. Futurists - it seems - went a bit too far in their passion: "Only the struggle is beautiful. Only that which is aggressive is a masterpiece. (...) We want to glorify war - the only hygiene of the world - militarism, patriotism, the destructive gesture of anarchists, beautiful ideas that kill, and proclaim contempt for women.

A few years later, World War I broke out, followed by the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, and soon World War II. "World hygiene" killed tens of millions of people.

In Poland, futurism flourished between 1918 and 1923, in Krakow and Warsaw. Futurist clubs "Pod Katarynką" and "Gałka Muszkatołowa" were founded, and manifestos were published, led by the famous "Jednodńuwka Futurystuw" by Bruno Jasieński and "Nuż w bżuhu" by Anatol Stern and Aleksander Wat. (We show their "gga. I polski almanach futurystyczny" from 1920).

The books presented at the exhibition originally belonged to Jalu Kurek, a writer who translated into Polish Marinetti's poetry published in issue 6 of "Zwrotnica" from 1923. This Krakow magazine was a place of exchange of ideas between representatives of various circles of Polish avant-garde with artists from other European countries, including Italian Futurists.

Apart from Marinetti, Kurek also maintained contacts with the poet and playwright Rugerro Vassari and the painter Enrico Prampolini, who donated his "Tarantella" to the International Collection of Modern Art of the "a.r" group.

It is interesting to note that several of the books on show are autographed by Marinetti with a dedication to Jalu Kurek.

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exhibition concept

Maciej Cholewiński, Aneta Błaszczyk-Smolec

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INFO

Place

ms1, 36 Więckowskiego St, entrance from 43 Gdańska St, reading room

Time

January 18 - April 1, 2022

exhibition concept

Maciej Cholewiński, Aneta Błaszczyk-Smolec

Share

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